I will sing of mercy and judgment: unto thee, O Lord, will I sing.
I will behave myself wisely in a perfect way. O when wilt thou come unto me? I will walk within my house with a perfect heart.
I will set no wicked thing before mine eyes: I hate the work of them that turn aside; it shall not cleave to me.
A froward heart shall depart from me: I will not know a wicked person. (Psalm 101:1-5)

I was considering what to post today and the Lord said to me, Psalm 101. The Psalmist here sings of both mercy and judgment, because they are inseparable. Often I hear people say that mercy triumphed over judgment at the cross, and this is a grave error. The truth is that God’s judgement was SATISFIED at the cross. Yet, even with Christ having satisfied God’s judgment, we who name Him as Lord are not free from judgment when we persist in sin.

The second verse has the Psalmist declaring that he will behave himself wisely, and that he would walk with a perfect heart, but today so often we excuse ourselves so readily by saying ‘nobody’s perfect,’ just so we can give ourselves permission to continue in habits of character and behavior that we know to be sinful. If the Psalmist, long before the indwelling of the Holy Spirit, could do this, it must surely be attainable for us.

Yet, despite the immeasurable bounties of the grace and empowerment of God through the Holy Spirit, many of us will continue to argue in favor of a sinful imperfection that is more of a habit than an incurable condition. We then go on to permit things in our lives that contaminate our minds and hearts, which makes sin so much easier to dabble in, and then our assertion that entire sanctification is impossible begins to seem to be proven to be true, when it is not.

One of these sources of contamination is what we choose to set before our eyes. As the Psalmist said, we ought to set no wicked thing before our eyes, yet so many of us are hooked on entertainment media in which adultery is portrayed as love, and the story-lines are written in such a way as to get the viewer or reader to identify and sympathize with the immoral protagonists. Brethren, we ought not to be so easily ensnared. This Psalm makes it clear that we ought to hate the work of them that turn aside… it never says that it matters whether the ones turning aside are fictional.

Yes, saints, in being a devoted fan of Scandal and other such entertainment, we sin against God. What are you setting before your eyes today?

‪#‎selah‬