false prophet

Cutting off all contact with the false prophet.

Cutting off all contact with the false prophet. This is absolutely crucial to your restoration if you have been victimized by a false prophet. Many saints make the mistake of keeping in touch with a false prophet, or continuing to watch/listen to their ministry programming, and this is a grave mistake because in so doing they are exposing themselves to the false anointing of that prophet and the spirits that accompany it.

Now, some will advocate forgiveness, and it is commendable to forgive. However, this doesn’t mean we should continue to expose ourselves to something unwholesome. If the prophet is continuing in operating in error, we can forgive without granting that person access to us. You could forgive someone for stealing your car, but that doesn’t mean you throw them the keys afterward, especially if you know they’re still stealing cars! Remember, we are to have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness (Ephesians 5:11), and 1 Corinthians 5 does instruct us to shun those who claim to be brethren but who refuse to turn from sin.

False Prophets are Vindictive

Because false prophets are so often emotionally immature, unbalanced, or even unhinged, they do tend to engage in spiteful, vindictive behavior when crossed, if they are in a position to do so. I once knew a prophet who was asked to speak at a prominent Chicago megachurch, a prospect which excited him very much. They gave him the mid-week service, which is often done to test out a new speaker. He preached his heart out, and the church loved it. This prompted, what seemed to him at that moment, a spontaneous act of generosity by the prophet who led that church:

He told the audience that he was taking a special offering ‘just for the man of God,’ and spent a few minutes exhorting the audience to really bless the guest speaker. They did. This pastor said he was inwardly praising God, because there was soon a large pile of money on the stage, and he had bills due. It may have been $10,000 or more. Before the offering was even complete, two deacons escorted the guest speaker to the pastor’s office.

The apostle (and prophet) who led that church soon met him at the office. He opened his Bible, and took out a pre-written check for $1000 and handed it to him. He kept the rest of the offering. When the guest speaker was invited again the following Sunday, this deceptive charade happened again, exactly the same way. The guest speaker didn’t protest, but recounted the story in book chapter titled ‘Deceit.’ He never mentioned the leader’s name, or even the city in which it happened.

However, the leader of that megachurch, who is widely and highly regarded not just as a prophet, but as an authority on all things prophetic, read the book and of course recognized the story. He immediately blackballed the guest speaker, who then suddenly found his speaking calendar quite empty. Not long after, this preacher met with that megachurch leader to apologize for slandering him.

Now, some of you may agree that writing about what happened was slander, but the dictionary tells us otherwise:

slan·der

[ˈslandər]

NOUN

law

the action or crime of making a false spoken statement damaging to a person’s reputation.

Therefore, what the guest preacher had done in his book was not slander, for two reasons. First, it was true. Second, in print, it’s called libel. You may now understand that the reason such stories are not often made public is that, even when names have not been named, the perpetrators of such vile deceit will retailiate vindictively. Given how Scripture repeatedly exhorts us to be merciful, to administer correction in love, and to restore those who stumble in meekness (Galatians 6:1), I believe we can safely conclude that vindictiveness is not the fruit of the Spirit, and should alert us to deeper underlying issues at work.

Flattery and the false prophet

Once a false prophet has secured a means whereby they may begin to gain influence, and often before this, they will make use of flattery to build rapport with key individuals.

A lying tongue hateth those that are afflicted by it; and a flattering mouth worketh ruin. (Proverbs 26:28)

False prophets usually hate the people they are seeking to manipulate, and no matter how harmless their flattery might be, the Bible says it works ruin. A compliment is sincere and unselfish admiration or appreciation, whereas flattery is insincere, and done with the intention of selfish gain. The flatterer wants something. Just by engaging in flatter, this person is sinning (Psalm 5:9, 78:36, Proverbs 29:5, e.g.). We are in fact warned not to involve ourselves with those who use flattery! (Proverbs 20:19)

False prophets, particularly in the early stages of acquiring influence, tend to lavish praise on people, seeming to be impressed by even things which may really be quite ordinary. Let’s face it, most of us like a good compliment, and since many who occupy positions of influence or leadership in churches and other faith communities also harbor secret (or not so secret) insecurities, the false prophet can easily gain their confidence by appearing to be an admirer or even a fan. This vulnerability to seduction is made worse by a tendency of insecure leaders to surround themselves with people who feed their ego and do not challenge their ideas or decisions. In contrast to this, Scripture tells us:

Without counsel purposes are disappointed: but in the multitude of counsellors they are established. (Proverbs 15:22)

Someone who always agrees with you is not a counsellor; that’s a yes-man. Yes men are a comfort to insecurities, but they are hardly constructive. While many, and maybe even most, yes-men mean well because they are ‘fans’ of their leader, the false prophet who becomes a yes-man does so in order to leverage the leader’s insecurities to his own advantage.

Other false prophets operating within a local body may engage in other kinds of manipulation, but most often some form of flattery will be involved. What we must bear in mind is that manipulative behavior of any sort in a prophet is a clear indicator that something is very wrong, and it’s a grave mistake not to deal with it immediately.

Secrets of the Prophetic Life


There’s so much about life in the prophetic life that should be obvious, even common sense, but in today’s world of widespread chicanery, they may as well be secrets. Much of this has more to do with habits of character than it does with any mystical or spooky experiences that so many prophets claim t have. Let’s talk about some of the things that contribute to a consistent and clear prophetic flow.

Brian Carn, the Lord rebuke you


;nbsp
It recently came to light that Brian Carn’s ‘prophecies’ for 2015 were plagiarized from a psychic who posted the same predictions 11 months before he did. Rather than repent, Brian has refused to admit to any wrongdoing. Let’s discuss why this is a huge problem…

Should the Church ‘reclaim’ occult practices?

  Sorry for not shaving 🙂

Some very popular ministries are now saying that we should ‘reclaim’ occult practices like astral projection and having spirit guides because they ‘belong’ to the church.

In John 16:13, Jesus said that the Holy Spirit would lead us into all truth. No additional spirits are neede to guide us.

In Deuteronomy 18: 9-13, God expressly tells his people not to take up the customs of the people in Canaan because He was driving them out for doing those things that the occult and new age movements embrace…

 

 

Amazing Superbowl Prophecy. NOT!

Looks like David E. Taylor took his ‘Amazing’ prophecy about the Superbowl off Youtube… He’d claimed that the Holy Spirit ‘witnessed’ to him that the Broncos would win… ROFL.

Prophets, please stop drinking your own Kool-Aid.